Nissan Tests Solution For Range Anxiety

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"It's Not About We Are Doing Right...It's About What You Are Doing Wrong"

Nissan is introducing a program designed to combat (the General Motor’s coined term) Range Anxiety,” namely with a no fault, coast to coast, roadside assistance program in Japan.

While the LEAF does have a mobile phone/personal computer application that can tell you the charge level in your LEAF (and how far you can safely travel in it),  there still may be a time when you find yourself unprepared for the distance to be travelled,  possibly ending up on the side of the road, out of juice.  What to do then?

For just such occasions when LEAF owners find themselves stranded without power, (and also for people who have a fear of such a situation), Nissan is offering a monthly service (1,500 yen/month-$18USD) that will pick you up, and drop you off at the nearest Nissan dealership to take advantage of their L3 (or L2 as the case may be) quick charge infrastructure to get you back on your way.

Also included in this $200-ish yearly program will be free ‘check-ups’ every 6 months for the LEAF, (no word on exactly what this entails as of yet), and will also provide insurance liability/coverage of up to 550,000 yen ($6,500USD) for expenses incurred by way of the battery running out of power.  /I’m guessing pizza delivery at the side of the road is on Nissan

No word yet if the program will arrive for the US…but in all likelihood, some variation on the theme will be in place by the time LEAFs start arriving at dealerships in December.

(nikkei-sub)

12 Responses

  1. garrytman says:

    People just need to keep an eye on their fuel gauge just like we do today. The other day on my way home saw some guy in a new chevy traverse on the side of the highway pouring gas in his tank. Some people will just not learn the limitations of their cars, no matter what is powering them.

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  2. evnow says:

    I’m trade marking “Range Anxiety is for Wimps” ;-)

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  3. Carcus says:

    I’ve already got a plan.

    Stashed in the back of the Leaf is a grocery bag labelled “in case of emergency”. Inside the bag — a long black extension cord and a ninja outfit.

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  4. reader says:

    There is no such thing as Level 3 charging. L3 is not standardized and you shouldn’t use the term, unless in the context of the dispute over it. Use DC Fast Charging. Sorry but them’s the facts.

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  5. BillS says:

    There is no such thing as Level 3 charging. L3 is not standardized and you shouldn’t use the term, unless in the context of the dispute over it. Use DC Fast Charging. Sorry but them’s the facts.  (Quote)

    This story is about Japan, the TEPCO/CHAdEMo standard is specified by the JEVS (Japan Electric Vehicle Standard). All the Japan manufacturers and Tokyo Electric have joined a coalition and have set the standard, they are not waiting on SAE.

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  6. reader said:
    There is no such thing as Level 3 charging. L3 is not standardized and you shouldn’t use the term, unless in the context of the dispute over it. Use DC Fast Charging. Sorry but them’s the facts.  (Quote)

    .

    BillS said:
    This story is about Japan, the TEPCO/CHAdEMo standard is specified by the JEVS (Japan Electric Vehicle Standard). All the Japan manufacturers and Tokyo Electric have joined a coalition and have set the standard, they are not waiting on SAE.  (Quote)

    Its ok/all good. I understand what he is saying, rightly so.

    I only use L3 because that is how Nissan refers to the chargers they make/have set up at the 200-odd dealers in Japan.

    The lack of standardization (especially in the US) is why Nissan was hesitant to put it on the LEAF in anything but a ‘+’ option, the disclaimer from them reads: “Quick charge port is TEPCO compliant and may not be compatible with future quick chargers. While quick charge capability may not exist in your market, availability will increase as the public infrastructure increases in the future.”

    Random linky to their quick charger:
    http://www.greencarcongress.com/2010/05/nissan-20100521.html

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  7. RB says:

    Nissan’s backup program is an excellent plan — hope it comes to North America. It’s an insurance plan, and insurance is most effective when it covers something one is worrying about. Even if the plan is never needed, its presence gives assurance and confidence, so it is worth something just for that. The nice part of having such a plan with a really new kind of vehicle is that we have no experience with the unusual happenings that may happen, or may not — we just don’t know. So it is nice to have a plan B, just in case.

    Now I guess you have to restrict your driving hours to when the dealership is open, but maybe they’ll give Leaf customers a key to the outside charger…. :)

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  8. mark says:

    I would never use it, but peace of mind for the wife would get me to

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  9. Van says:

    Get it while its hot, because this will only need to last until folks grow accustomed to using the “EV – it” nav system to keep drivers on the path of the possible. Note the issue is in apprehension, not reality.

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